Thursday, January 24, 2008

"There's No Business Like SHOAH Business"

In 1969, the Jewish Claims Conference called the "Final Federal Compensation Law" a "harmonious settlement" with Germany.

Except when the Zionists realized they had a money making proposition in their version of the Holocaust©, they realized the could use their version of the Holocaust© as the ultimate shake-down racket, extorting money out of succeeding generations of people world-wide.

A shake-down racket that continues on to this day, with the so-called "victims" asking for an ever increasing amount of money from governments world-wide.

A nice side benefit to this racket--for Israel--is that Israel can continue on with its ethnic cleansing of the Palestinians, using what allegedly happened in their version of the Holocaust© as an excuse to commit murder on a grand scale, against the indigenous Palestinians.

Ask simple questions about the Holocaust© here in the states and you'll be threatened with physical violence or denied or fired from your job. Threats which I have been on the receiving end of, all for asking questions.

Ask a simple question about the Holocaust© in Europe and you'll be physically attacked. And more than likely, be brought up on charges and wind up spending time in prison.

All for the crime of asking questions about the Zionist version of the Holocaust©.

P.S. A curious side note to this imbroglio is that in Israel, most of the "alleged" victims of the Holocaust© live in poverty, since Israel refuses to part with the extorted money it has received from the world.

From an online article in Der Spiegel

More than 60 years after the Holocaust, survivors and their heirs are filing new claims for compensation against Germany. And the Israeli government wants Berlin to provide additional payments of millions of euros to help pay for social services for survivors.

Orli, together with other survivors, has formed an organization called YESH -- Children and Orphans Holocaust Survivors in Israel, which is preparing a lawsuit against Germany. "We want the German government to recognize our suffering," says Orli.

A lot of money is at stake. The representatives of the children of the Shoah are demanding more than the usual compensation. They want their clients to receive an orphan's pension -- "the same as the children of fallen Wehrmacht soldiers," Orli explains. His organization wants every surviving member of the children of the Shoah to be paid €7,200 for each year spent as an orphan. For the 250,000 survivors still alive today, that would come to €1.8 billion per orphaned year. The Holocaust survivors' group also wants the German government to pay for health disorders and the loss of career opportunities.

The children of the Shoah are not the only survivors' rights group filing new claims against Germany. Indeed, the German government is facing a wave of lawsuits and new demands. Some of those filing the current suits were forgotten when the original compensation treaties were drawn up, some were deliberately left out, and others missed the necessary deadlines. Holocaust reparations have become an "endless story," says Constantin Goschler, a German historian and author of the definitive work "Schuld und Schulden. Die Politik der Wiedergutmachung für NS-Verfolgte seit 1945" ("Guilt and Debts. The Politics of Reparations for Nazi Victims since 1945").

The material aspects of the process of dealing with Germany's Nazi past, begun right after the war by then Chancellor Konrad Adenauer and then Israeli Prime Minister David Ben-Gurion, were originally supposed to have been completed by the late 1960s. After tough negotiations between the Jewish Claims Conference (JCC) and Germany, the German parliament, the Bundestag, ratified the "Final Federal Compensation Law" in 1965, which set a 1969 deadline for the filing of complaints. There was considerable agreement between the parties at the time, so much so that then JCC Chairman Nahum Goldmann called the German law a "harmonious settlement."

He was wrong, as has become clear today. In addition to lawsuits being filed by various victims' groups, the Jewish Claims Conference is back at the negotiating table with the German Finance Ministry. The Israeli government is also calling on Berlin to make additional payments, even though Jerusalem signed a written promise, after the end of the compensation negotiations, that the Jewish state would "file no further claims against the Federal Republic of Germany."

Israeli Minister of Pensioners Affairs Rafi Eitan is the cabinet minister responsible for the issue.

He is still banned from entering the United States today, because he recruited American intelligence agent Jonathan Pollard as a spy. Pollard was sentenced to life in prison.

Eitan has little use for diplomatic niceties, as Berlin has already learned. In a letter he wrote in August to the head of the German Chancellery, Thomas de Maizière, Eitan demanded that Berlin forgive all of Israel's debt to Germany -- a total of about €500 million. Israel, he wrote, wanted to deposit the money into a fund for Holocaust survivors. When Deputy Finance Minister Karl Diller visited Jerusalem recently (more...), Eitan repeated his unusual proposal. When Diller told him that Germany could hardly comply with his wish, the minister replied: "Then just give us the money."

Eitan has a long list of demands. In addition to debt cancellation, he wants the German government to provide about €26 million a year for a group of 8,000 Holocaust survivors who have yet to receive any compensation at all. He also wants the Germans to recognize the so-called "second circle" survivors who managed to escape internment in ghettos or camps by fleeing Nazi-occupied areas. The Israeli government has allocated €90 million to help this group of people.

About 80,000 Holocaust survivors still live in poverty in Israel today. In August the state comptroller, a sort of Israeli ombudsman for all kinds of disputes and controversies, published a report sharply critical of the government for its treatment of Holocaust survivors. According to the report, the state has "the ultimate moral obligation to address the welfare of the Holocaust survivors without delay." The government's lapses are all the more serious, wrote the state comptroller, because the reparations agreement deprived the survivors of the right to demand compensation from Germany.

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